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In Photos: Nanisiniq. Ten years later …

Tony Eetak re-connects with Jordan Konek, both from Arviat, Nunavut on campus at the University of Winnipeg during the Inuit Studies Conference earlier this month. Ten years ago this October, Jordan was a student with the original Nanisiniq Arviat History Project. This project draws on many of those early experiences.
Cultural Entrepreneurship incubator and emerging artist Tony Eetak meets with Jordan Konek from the Nanisiniq Arviat History Project.
Ten years ago Jordan was presenting at the Inuit Studies Conference as a student. Youth like Tony are able to learn from the experiences of previous community-based research and the arts. Photo: Jamie Bell

Nanisiniq: Ten Years Later …

Tony Eetak re-connects with Jordan Konek, both from Arviat, Nunavut on campus at the University of Winnipeg during the Inuit Studies Conference earlier this month. Ten years ago this October, Jordan was a student with the original Nanisiniq Arviat History Project.

Ten years later, youth like Tony who were very young when the original Nanisiniq project took place are able to learn from those past community-based approaches and experiences as they begin explore their own opportunities, this time in the digital arts and cultural sectors.

Technologies and opportunities that did not exist then for most northern communities are now able to be explored more meaningfully, such as our digital and cultural entrepreneurship incubator pilot project made possible with the support of the Canada Council for the Arts Digital Greenhouse program.

In the coming year they’ll be connecting with and learning from a diversity of new projects, communities and exciting collaborations.

2012 was also the first year many of took part in events with Global Dignity Canada.

Related Reading:

The Nanisiniq Arviat History Project (2010-2012) was a model that has been used several times, contributing to the success of several projects that followed over this past decade. Here are just a few of the projects and outputs that came from that project. Our Incubator for Digital Arts and Cultural Entrepreneurship, based in Winnipeg, draws directly from many of those early social research and documentary film experiences.

The Contribution of Inuit Youth and Community-Driven Informal Educational Programs to Life-Long Learning and Perseverence
http://colloques.uqac.ca/prscpp/files/2019/04/Rahm_Tagalik_Baker_Billard_Bell_Anoee_LH%C3%A9rault_Truchon_AN.pdf

SSHRC Knowledge Synthesis: The design and development of digital return platforms for Northern Indigenous heritage
https://arcticdh.ucalgary.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/Knowledgesynthesisweb.pdf

Critical Social Work: Institutional Barriers to Community-Based Research: Learning from the Nunavut, Nanivara Project
http://www1.uwindsor.ca/criticalsocialwork/InstitutionalBarriers

Cultivating a digital heritage: Social media and emerging technologies meet traditional knowledge and cultural history 
https://www.sshrc-crsh.gc.ca/society-societe/stories-histoires/story-histoire-eng.aspx?story_id=168

Arviat’s film society moves from milestone to milestone
https://nunatsiaq.com/stories/article/65674arviats_film_society_moves_from_milestone_to_milestone/

Nanisiniq Arviat History Project
https://nanisiniq-blog-blog.tumblr.com

Picture of teetak

teetak

Tony Eetak is an emerging youth artist and culture connector originally from Arviat, Nunavut and a founding member of the @1860 Winnipeg Arts collective. With a growing interest in photography, music and visual arts, Tony has been a dedicated volunteer for participatory arts events in his community, working for more than five years with organizations and projects including the Arviat Film Society, Global Dignity Canada, Inclusion in Northern Research, Our People, Our Climate and Niriqatiginnga.

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